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John Thompson
John Thompson

How the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 Protects and Promotes Student Press Freedom



Campus Journalism Act of 1991: A Milestone for Student Press Freedom in the Philippines




Campus journalism is a form of journalism that is practiced by students in educational institutions. It involves producing and publishing various types of media content, such as newspapers, magazines, newsletters, blogs, podcasts, videos, and social media posts, that cater to the needs and interests of the student body. Campus journalism is not only a way of informing, educating, entertaining, and empowering students, but also a means of developing their skills, values, character, and discipline. Moreover, campus journalism is a manifestation of the freedom of expression and the freedom of the press that are guaranteed by the Constitution and other laws.




Campus Journalism Act Of 1991 Pdf 30


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One of the most significant laws that uphold and protect these freedoms at the campus level is Republic Act No. 7079, or the Campus Journalism Act of 1991. This law was enacted on July 5, 1991 by former President Corazon Aquino, who herself was a staunch advocate of democracy and human rights. The Campus Journalism Act of 1991 aims to promote the development and growth of campus journalism as a means of strengthening ethical values, encouraging critical and creative thinking, and developing moral character and personal discipline of the Filipino youth. It also seeks to improve the journalistic skills of students and promote responsible and free journalism.


The Campus Journalism Act of 1991 has several provisions that are intended to achieve these objectives. Some of these provisions are:



  • The establishment of student publications in every school that are published by students through an editorial board and publication staff composed of students selected by fair and competitive examinations.



  • The determination of editorial policies by the editorial board without any interference from the school administration or any outside party.



  • The management of publication funds by the editorial board without any withholding or delay from the school administration or any outside party.



  • The protection of student journalists from any form of censorship, harassment, discrimination, suspension, expulsion, or legal action arising from their performance.



  • The recognition of student journalists' right to access information relevant to their publication.



  • The creation of a National Secondary Schools Press Conference (NSSPC) and a National Schools Press Conference (NSPC) for elementary and secondary schools respectively, where student journalists can compete in various journalistic contests and attend seminars and workshops.



  • The establishment of a National Student Press Council (NSPC) composed of representatives from the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS), the student press, and other sectors, which shall oversee the implementation of the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 and serve as a consultative and advisory body.



The Campus Journalism Act of 1991 has been hailed as a milestone for student press freedom in the Philippines, as it recognizes the vital role of campus journalism in fostering democracy, social justice, and national development. However, the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 also faces some challenges and limitations in its implementation and enforcement. Some of these challenges and limitations are:



  • The lack of awareness and appreciation of the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 among students, teachers, school administrators, and other stakeholders.



  • The lack of resources and support for campus publications, such as adequate funding, facilities, equipment, materials, training, and guidance.



  • The lack of consistency and quality in the selection and evaluation of student journalists and editorial board members.



  • The lack of compliance and cooperation from some school administrators and other parties who may attempt to control, influence, or suppress campus publications.



  • The lack of protection and security for student journalists who may face threats, intimidation, violence, or legal action from those who are offended or aggrieved by their reports.



  • The lack of coordination and collaboration among campus journalists, student organizations, professional media groups, and other sectors who can help promote and defend campus journalism.



Given these challenges and limitations, there is a need to review and revise the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 to make it more responsive and relevant to the changing needs and realities of campus journalism in the Philippines. Some of the possible amendments or improvements that can be made to the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 are:



  • The inclusion of tertiary level schools in the coverage and scope of the Campus Journalism Act of 1991, as they also have student publications that face similar issues and concerns as those in elementary and secondary schools.



  • The clarification and specification of the roles and responsibilities of the faculty adviser, the publication adviser, the Parents-Teachers' Association representative, and other parties involved in the editorial board or publication staff.



  • The expansion and diversification of the sources and modes of funding for campus publications, such as student fees, donations, sponsorships, advertisements, grants, and online platforms.



  • The standardization and regularization of the frequency and format of campus publications, such as monthly or quarterly issues, print or digital media, or a combination thereof.



  • The enhancement and updating of the curriculum and training for student journalists and editorial board members, such as incorporating new media technologies, skills, ethics, and standards.



  • The strengthening and enforcement of the sanctions and penalties for those who violate or disregard the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 or any other related laws or policies.



  • The establishment and activation of mechanisms for monitoring, reporting, resolving, and preventing cases or incidents involving campus journalism.



Despite these challenges and limitations, there are also many examples and instances of campus journalism in the Philippines that showcase its best practices and achievements. Some of these examples and instances are:



  • The awards and recognition given to outstanding campus publications and journalists by various organizations and institutions, such as the Philippine Press Institute (PPI), the Philippine Information Agency (PIA), the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility (CMFR), the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines (NUJP), the Philippine Daily Inquirer (PDI), Rappler, GMA Network, ABS-CBN Corporation, among others.



  • The innovative and creative ways of campus journalists to produce quality content and engage their audiences, such as using multimedia platforms, social media tools, interactive features, data visualization techniques, investigative reporting methods, citizen journalism approaches, among others.



organizing events or activities, issuing statements or resolutions, among others.


Conclusion




Campus journalism is a valuable and vital form of journalism that deserves more attention and recognition in the Philippines. It is not only a way of informing, educating, entertaining, and empowering students, but also a means of developing their skills, values, character, and discipline. Moreover, it is a manifestation of the freedom of expression and the freedom of the press that are guaranteed by the Constitution and other laws.


One of the most significant laws that uphold and protect these freedoms at the campus level is Republic Act No. 7079, or the Campus Journalism Act of 1991. This law was enacted on July 5, 1991 by former President Corazon Aquino, who herself was a staunch advocate of democracy and human rights. The Campus Journalism Act of 1991 aims to promote the development and growth of campus journalism as a means of strengthening ethical values, encouraging critical and creative thinking, and developing moral character and personal discipline of the Filipino youth. It also seeks to improve the journalistic skills of students and promote responsible and free journalism.


However, the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 also faces some challenges and limitations in its implementation and enforcement. There is a need to review and revise the Campus Journalism Act of 1991 to make it more responsive and relevant to the changing needs and realities of campus journalism in the Philippines. There are also many examples and instances of campus journalism in the Philippines that showcase its best practices and achievements.


Therefore, as readers and citizens, we should support and participate in campus journalism. We should appreciate and recognize the work and contribution of campus journalists. We should also protect and defend their rights and interests. We should also encourage and inspire more students to join and excel in campus journalism. By doing so, we can help foster a culture of democracy, social justice, and national development in our country.


FAQs





  • What is the difference between campus journalism and professional journalism?



  • What are some of the skills and qualities that a campus journalist should have?



  • What are some of the challenges or problems that a campus journalist may encounter?



  • What are some of the benefits or rewards that a campus journalist may enjoy?



  • What are some of the ways or tips that a campus journalist can improve his or her craft?



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